Reading with Chad Gowey 

Chad Gowey is a freelance illustrator working out of Los Angeles. He is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and seems to have a knack for picturing books. His work as appeared in numerous publications and books including the publishers Chronicle Books, David R. Godine.

He also does has regular gig for Bookmarks magazine in which all these illustrations have appeared.

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The challenge is on: How might we leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities?

The mission of the Knight Foundation is simple: To support “transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. We believe that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged.”

One way they do this is to pose a challenge to the community at large, sift through the responses and then fund the winners.

The latest challenge is:

How might we leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities?

680 responses have been submitted and the challenge is currently in its feedback phase.

"During this phase, we review every entry we received, with the help of a team of outside readers. We also invite the public to look through submissions and offer feedback, ideas, and questions." Then the refinement period kicks in followed by the evaluation period which leads us to January 30, 2015 when the winners will be announced and the $2.5 million will be distributed!

The submissions are as varied as the patrons that populate our public libraries.

I can go on and on.

Go get lost in the possibilities 

What a great project

Startling Art: Revealing the Art of Dennis Larkins

Published by La Luz De Jesus Press and Last Grasp Press, 2010.

From the publisher:

 The art of Dennis Larkins ranges from retro-kitsch paintings of multi-dimensional landscapes to his legendary and iconic series of Grateful Dead concert posters. Larkins images were forever burned into the pop psyche by the groundbreaking stage monoliths he created for promoter Bill Graham. At last, here is a definitive collection of Larkins works - four decades of his creative growth and expression distilled in to a gorgeous, full-color hardcover. Startling Art is an in-depth look at an artist immersed in the visual vernacular of pop surrealism, uniquely drawn from a life lived in the trenches of pop culture.

Available here

Ready for Some Finger Reading?
The latest gem to be concocted in MIT’s Media Lab is the FingerReader. Billed as “a wearable interface for reading on the go,” the device:

is a tool both for visually impaired people that require help with accessing printed text, as well as an aid for language translation. Wearers scan a text line with their finger and receive an audio feedback of the words and a haptic feedback of the layout: start and end of line, new line, and other cues.
The FingerReader algorithm knows to detect and give feedback when the user veers away from the baseline of the text, and helps them maintain a straight scanning motion within the line.

It’s too early to tell if the product will ever make it to market but clearly we have to keep these guys locked up in that lab so they keep churning out stuff like this. 
Video 
More:Let Your Finger Do The Reading With This Great Device From MIT Media Lab | Big Think

Previously on Book Patrol:Braigo: A Braille Printer Made From Legos

Ready for Some Finger Reading?

The latest gem to be concocted in MIT’s Media Lab is the FingerReader. Billed as “a wearable interface for reading on the go,” the device:

is a tool both for visually impaired people that require help with accessing printed text, as well as an aid for language translation. Wearers scan a text line with their finger and receive an audio feedback of the words and a haptic feedback of the layout: start and end of line, new line, and other cues.

The FingerReader algorithm knows to detect and give feedback when the user veers away from the baseline of the text, and helps them maintain a straight scanning motion within the line.

It’s too early to tell if the product will ever make it to market but clearly we have to keep these guys locked up in that lab so they keep churning out stuff like this. 

Video 

More:
Let Your Finger Do The Reading With This Great Device From MIT Media Lab | Big Think

Previously on Book Patrol:
Braigo: A Braille Printer Made From Legos

A Birthday Salute to Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde was our first literary rock star whose work continues to be widely read and his plays regularly produced. His epic 1882 tour of America has been referred to as the birth of celebrity culture in America. His witticism is legendary and his homosexuality was the cause of unfathomable persecution. 

We salute Oscar Wilde for blazing the way on so many fronts.

From David M. Friedman’s salute at The Huffington Post:

Decades before Norman Mailer, Wilde knew the value of “advertisements for myself.” Decades before Andy Warhol, he saw the beauty in commerce and the importance of image in marketing.

Decades before Kim Kardashian, he grasped that fame could be fabricated in the media. Decades before TMZ or Us Weekly, Oscar Wilde created celebrity culture

The Picture of Dorian Gray. Lithographs and etchings by Jim Dine. Published by London: Petersburg Press, 1968, edition “C” (the preferred deluxe edition), number 33 of 100 copies ill’d by Jim Dine with 12 original color lithographs + the extra suite of 10 additional color prints: 6 signed lithographs (as in edition A) and 4 signed etchings (as in edition B). Buy.

Portrait by Ralph Steadman. Steel plate etching in an edition of only 20 copies, each SIGNED and numbered by Steadman Buy.

SalomeA tragedy in one act. Illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley, Translated and introduced by R. A. Walker. Published by Heinemann. London. 1957,  The first truly complete edition. Illustrated with decorative title & contents pages, an unused cover design, 14 fine full page plates and 1 vignette by Aubrey Beardsley, including two previously unpublished and one published in its un-expurgated version for for the first time. Buy

 House of Pomegranates. Illustrated by Jessie King. Published by London Methuen & Co. Ltd, 1915. Four Fairy Tales which were originally told by Wilde to his children. Buy.

Poems. Published by London: The Chiswick Press for Elkin Matthews & John Lane, 1892. One of 220 copies, signed by Wilde. Bound in 20th-century purple crushed morocco gilt by Sangorski and Sutcliffe. Buy.

Ballad of Reading Gaol by C.3.3. Published by London Leonard Smithers 1898, First edition, one of 800 copies printed on handmade paper. Buy.

The Reader Redux: Blind man solicits readers to fill “huge empty space”

Remember The Reader by Bernhard Schlink? Originally published in Germany in 1995 it went on to sell, after an Oprah push, over two million copies in the U.S. and became the first German book to top The New York Times bestseller list. It focused on an illiterate German women with a Nazi past who seduced a younger boy so that he may read to her.

Well here is a new twist on the intriguing theme.

The sign above recently appeared in the window of a bookshop in London. Andrew Bailey suffers from the degenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia and has been unable to read for the last 15 years. Finding that audiobooks began sounding  ‘too robotic’ Bailey took to asking for help in finding someone to read to him.

What he didn’t expect was the sudden outpouring of support with “dozens of offers of help.” You see someone passing by the bookshop snapped a picture of his plea and posted it on Twitter and it quickly went viral, being retweeted over 1250 times. 

 His wish list includes 100 books he would like to have read to him including My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult and The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole by Sue Townsend. He also wants to hear books by Charles Dickens.

What a great story.

More:
Dozens offer to read books to blind man after carer’s advert in bookshop window was spotted and posted on Twitter | Daily Mail
Blind man Andrew Bailey’s reader search goes viral | BBC