Banned Books Week Warm Up: School Board in Oregon fighting over “Persepolis” 

Why wait until Banned Books Week starts next week to start celebrating the madness.

This time we go to Murphy, Oregon where things got a little heated at the Three Rivers School Board meeting.

At issue: Persepolis, an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi about her experiences growing up during the Iranian revolution. 

The ‘problem’: the book contains some questionable language and depicts scenes of torture and some parents want to be able to sign off and give their approval before their kids can enjoy it.

Apparently, one school board member (a librarian) was a little zealous in defending the book, frequently interrupting a parent as he read from it - she wanted to know if he knew what the book was about or if he was just going to read the portions to the board to show where he was offended.

As for where the challenge stands - the parents need to go through the district’s chain of command for requesting a review of “Persepolis,” which involves contacting the superintendent and director of curriculum. Then, if nothing happens, the parents can return to the board for possible action.

Oh, and by the way, Persepolis is on the suggested reading list from the Oregon Department of Education.

The book; however, is currently banned in two places - Chicago public school schools (for seventh graders) and in Iran!

Buy: Powell’s | Amazon | First Edition

More: Controversial book spurs battle at school board meeting Grants Pass Daily Courier:

books0977
books0977:

The Red Cape (1902). Alphonse Maria Mucha (Czech, 1860-1939). Oil on canvas.
Mucha insisted always that, rather than adhering to any fashionable stylistic form, his paintings came purely from within and Czech art. He declared that art existed only to communicate a spiritual message, and nothing more; hence his frustration at the fame he gained through commercial art, when he wanted always to concentrate on more lofty projects that would ennoble art and his birthplace.

books0977:

The Red Cape (1902). Alphonse Maria Mucha (Czech, 1860-1939). Oil on canvas.

Mucha insisted always that, rather than adhering to any fashionable stylistic form, his paintings came purely from within and Czech art. He declared that art existed only to communicate a spiritual message, and nothing more; hence his frustration at the fame he gained through commercial art, when he wanted always to concentrate on more lofty projects that would ennoble art and his birthplace.

Bookcase with Moss

Are you still looking for that perfect bookshelf to house your natural history, botany or nature writing collection?

Well, I think we found it.

Created by Alcarol, the bookshelf is called Undergrowth and was recently on display at the London Design Festival.

The bookshelf retains the vegetation present on the log when it was retrieved from the forest. The mossy edges are then cast in resin and preserved.

Mosses and lichens are very primitive organisms that grow in damp places, including rocks and trees. They form the lowest layer of forest vegetation and are equipped with chlorophyll giving them a green colour of varying degrees of intensity. alcarol recovered some logs from the undergrowth of the Italian Dolomite mountains and cut planks that preserve the natural edges with their native populations of plants, which are embedded in a resin resembling the water that generated their life.

A five book (one letter and one record) birthday salute to william carlos williams

Today is the birthday of the influential American poet William Carlos Williams (1883-1963).

From the Poetry Foundation:

William Carlos Williams has always been known as an experimenter, an innovator, a revolutionary figure in American poetry. Yet in comparison to artists of his own time who sought a new environment for creativity as expatriates in Europe, Williams lived a remarkably conventional life. A doctor for more than forty years serving the New Jersey town of Rutherford, he relied on his patients, the America around him, and his own ebullient imagination to create a distinctively American verse.

The goods:

Paterson.  Published by New Directions, 1946-58. Williams’s magnum opus.

A Beginning of a Short Story. Published by The Alicat Bookshop Press, 1950. First edition.

Collected Poems. The Objectivist Press, 1934. Williams’s first “collected” edition.

The Farmers’ Daughters. New Directions, 1961 First edition, first printing. One of 1500 copies. Publisher’s file copy with file copy stamp to front endpaper.

Sour Grapes. Published in Boston by The Four Seas Company, 1921 First edition, first printing of Williams’ fifth book. One of 1000 copies. Signed and inscribed by Williams to close friend and fellow poet Mitchell Dawson.

William Carlos Williams Reading his Poems. Caedmon. 1954

Typed Letter Signed “W.C. Williams” 1p, 8.5” x 11”. Rutherford, N.J., October 19, 1938.To John Crowe Ransom, Editor The Kenyon Review, Gambier, Ohio. Fine condition.“Your letter, about the Lorca article, put me right back on my feet again…”